For the love of science: New Raytheon grants help teachers raise the next generation of engineers


Wednesday, December 10, 2014

WALTHAM, Mass. (Dec. 10, 2014) — Raytheon Company (NYSE: RTN) is awarding 36 Engineering is Elementary® (EiE) Scholarships to teachers in disadvantaged, rural, or inner-city schools across the country. Each teacher will receive $2,500 towards implementing the innovative EiE curriculum developed by the Museum of Science, Boston.

EiE was designed by the Museum's National Center for Technological Literacy® (NCTL®) to help elementary school educators and students better understand engineering and technology concepts. Research shows EiE helps elementary students become more interested in engineering as a career.

The award-winning curriculum has already reached an estimated 73,500 teachers and 6.8 million students.

"Raytheon's generous support further expands our mission to bring engineering to elementary-aged children by accelerating adoption of EiE in underserved school districts," said Museum of Science president and director Ioannis Miaoulis, who launched the NCTL to introduce engineering in schools and museums nationwide through advocacy, educational products, and educator professional development.

Each scholarship includes professional development that prepares teachers to use EiE along with a complete set of curriculum resources. “Many elementary teachers don’t have a background in science or engineering,” says Christine Cunningham, director and founder of EiE and vice president for research at the Museum of Science, Boston. “We’re really pleased to offer support through Raytheon scholarships; workshop graduates tell us EiE professional development helps them feel confident about teaching these subjects.”

Over the past three years, Raytheon has awarded nearly 100 individual teacher scholarships as part of its $1 million EiE grant to the Museum. The grant is awarded through Raytheon’s MathMovesU® program, an initiative designed to engage middle and elementary school students and build their interest in math and science education.

The 2015 Raytheon-Engineering is Elementary Teacher Scholarship recipients are:

Carmen Andrews, Six to Six Magnet School, Bridgeport, Conn.

Brittney Armstrong, Slaughter Elementary School, Louisville, Ky.

Cara Baldree, Lincoln Elementary School, Salt Lake City, Utah

Timothy Begley, W.F. Killip Elementary School, Flagstaff, Ariz.

Christie Bergh, Westside Elementary School, Warner Robins, Ga.

Jennifer Brown, Georgetown East Elementary School, Annapolis, Md.

Amanda Casey, Kate Shepard Elementary School, Mobile, Ala.

Elizabeth Cooke, Markham Elementary School, Oakland, Calif.

Amanda Crane, Philip Shore Elementary Magnet School of the Arts, Tampa, Fla.

Loralie Cuff, Vail Pittman Elementary School, Las Vegas, Nev.

Elisabeth Foro, Cass Street School, Milwaukee, Wis.

Bernadette Freeland, Weller Road Elementary School, Silver Spring, Md.

Anna Gaiter, Plainview Academic Charter Academy, Tujunga, Calif.

Deborah Gordon, Vista Del Monte Elementary School, Palm Springs, Calif.

Tamara Grottker, Copperfield Elementary School, Austin, Texas

LaNelle Harvey, 93rd Street Elementary School, Los Angeles, Calif.

Candace Hebert, Palo Verde Elementary School, Casa Grande, Ariz.

Darlene Higuera, Elvira Elementary School, Tucson, Ariz.

Andrew Kelley, Josiah Quincy School, Boston, Mass.

Deborah Khadaran, West Hollywood Elementary School, Hollywood, Fla.

Lauren Levy, Synergy Charter Academy, Los Angeles, Calif.

Amee Lewis, Appling County Elementary School, Baxley, Ga.

Patty Myers, C.W. Morey School, Lowell, Mass.

Katharine Otto, Chase Elementary School, Chicago, Ill.

David Owens, 96th Street Elementary School, Los Angeles, Calif.

Taimi Paadre, Claremont Academy, Worcester, Mass.

Vicki Peterson, Rancho Viejo Elementary School, Yuma, Ariz.

Gloria Pritchett, Wickes Elementary School, Wickes, Ark.

Cynthia Reynolds, Warsaw Elementary School, Warsaw, N.C.

Karen Scholz, John F. Kennedy Elementary School, Jamaica Plain, Mass.

Faith Shiver, Harper Elementary School, Thomasville, Ga.

John Silverthorne, Brentwood Magnet Elementary School of Engineering, Raleigh, N.C.

Diana Thompson, Whittier Elementary School, Costa Mesa, Calif.

Heather Tinker, Alice Maxwell Elementary School, Sparks, Nev.

Robyn Tirschel, 96th Street Elementary School, Los Angeles, Calif.

Sheryl Wells, W.F. Killip Elementary School, Flagstaff, Ariz.

About the Museum of Science, Boston

The Museum of Science, Boston is the nation's first science museum with a comprehensive strategy and infrastructure to foster technological literacy in science museums and schools across the United States. NCTL curricula have reached an estimated 7.1 million students and 80,000 teachers. One of the world's largest science centers and New England's most attended cultural institution, the Museum of Science introduces about 1.5 million visitors a year to science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) via dynamic programs and hundreds of interactive exhibits. Founded in 1830, the Museum was first to embrace all the sciences under one roof. Highlights include the Hall of Human Life, Thomson Theater of Electricity, Charles Hayden Planetarium, Mugar Omni Theater, Gordon Current Science & Technology Center, 4-D Theater, and Butterfly Garden. The Museum also leads a 10-year, $41 million National Science Foundation-funded Nanoscale Informal Science Education Network of science museums. Visit:

About Raytheon

Raytheon Company, with 2013 sales of $24 billion and 63,000 employees worldwide, is a technology and innovation leader specializing in defense, security and civil markets throughout the world. With a history of innovation spanning 92 years, Raytheon provides state-of-the-art electronics, mission systems integration and other capabilities in the areas of sensing; effects; and command, control, communications and intelligence systems, as well as cyber security and a broad range of mission support services. Raytheon is headquartered in Waltham, Mass. For more about Raytheon, visit us at and follow us on Twitter @raytheon.