Our Mission

Engineering is Elementary supports educators and children with curricula and professional development that develop engineering literacy.

Our Curriculum Products:

The EiE Curriculum


Choose from 20 flexible and fun units for grades 1 - 5. Integrates with the science you already teach! Research-based, teacher-tested activities develop creativity, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills.

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Engineering Adventures


Add adventure to your afterschool or camp programs with real-world engineering challenges for kids in grades 3 – 5. Promotes creativity and teamwork!

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Engineering Everywhere


For youth in grades 6 – 8 in out-of-school time and camp programs. They’ll engineer a better world with engaging activities that relate to real-life experiences.

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BOSTON, Mass. – The Museum of Science announced today that a generous grant from EMC Corporation to the Museum of Science, Boston will help elementary schools in Worcester implement an award-winning...
BOSTON, Mass.—A Global Impact Grant from Cisco Systems, Inc. for Engineering is Elementary® (EiE®); a project of the Museum of Science, Boston; will fund a pilot project to create digital...


You’ll Go Wild for These Four Animal-Themed Engineering Activities
Posted by Annie Whitehouse on 10/27/16 11:00 AM
At EiE, we’ve learned that the best way to get kids interested in engineering is to connect to a subject they care about. Every kid is different—some might be interested in transportation...
For Chicago’s Diverse-Needs Students, EiE Works
Posted by Cynthia Berger on 10/25/16 11:00 AM
Back in the 1920s, the Christopher School was built to serve students with disabilities, including many affected by polio. Today, this Chicago public school serves an unusually diverse student...
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EiE is an excellent inquiry-based STEM curriculum that teaches students thinking and reasoning skills needed for success. Built around the engineering design process, EiE teaches kids how to solve problems systematically . . . creating skills, optimism, and attitudes important for their futures. Life is not multiple choice.

Laura J. Bottomley, Ph.D, Director, The Engineering Place
North Carolina State University